Tag: Judge

National Law Day – Judicial Independence Panel Discussion

In honor of National Law Day, our library will be holding a judicial panel discussion with three esteemed justices from the Fourth Court of Appeal and two Riverside County Superior Court judges about the role of judicial independence in a politically divided society. But what is judicial independence and what shape does it take in the California judicial system? Judicial independence allows our judicial officers the ability to do their jobs without external influences. Let’s just say that the...

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Look into my Crystal Ball

When I was a (younger) kid many moons ago, I remember going to the county fair.  One of the booths housed Madame Mousee (pronounced Moo Say).  The thing that caught my attention was her crystal ball.  Didn’t understand the cards or palm reading but that crystal ball really captivated me.  As I stared at it, the ball started to glow and Madame Mousee told me that for $3, she could tell my future.  Sure, why not.  10 minutes later (and $3 poorer), she told me the “spirits” told...

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Law Day 2014 at the RCLL

If you didn’t know, Thursday, May 1, 2014 was Law Day at the Riverside County Law Library.  As part of the festivities, Judge Jackson Lucky was our keynote speaker.  Judge Lucky’s presentation on voting rights and the importance of exercising your right to vote was both informative and very interesting. He mentioned that often times, especially for young people, that the sentiment that every vote counts seems quite far fetched. Some questions that Judge Lucky fleshed out were how can...

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Law Day 2014 Recap

Last Thursday,  40 people had the opportunity to hear Judge Jackson Lucky. Presiding Judge of the Family Law Court address the ABA ‘s Law Day Theme for 2014: American Democracy and the rule of Law:  Why Every Vote Matters. Judge Lucky took the audience on an historical tour of the history of voting in America.   Our voting rights past can be said to be somewhat checkered.   He pointed out that Black men could not vote until 1870.  It took until 1920 for women to get the vote at all.  He pointed...

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